Tag Archives: meditation

To comfort

The Raising of Lazarus (after Rembrandt)
Vincent van Gogh (1853 – 1890), Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, May 1890
oil on paper, 50 cm x 65.5 cm
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

When Jesus arrived, he found that Lazarus had already been in the tomb for four days. Now Bethany was near Jerusalem, only about two miles away. And many of the Jews had come to Martha and Mary to comfort them about their brother. John 11:17-19

There is a tremendous sorrow in our world right now. We need each other’s love and compassion. We need to comfort one another.

Today I will offer comfort to someone in need.

I fear no evil

American Colony (Jerusalem). Photo Department, photographer
Set of thirteen select slides of shepherd life, illustrating the Twenty Third Psalm. “He maketh me to lie down in green pastures”

The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want. Psalm 23:1

May my heart reflect and bless the world with the goodness and love that is my birthright.

May I live as a child of the Light and produce every kind of goodness and love.

May the Lord open my eyes that I may see goodness and love in everyone I encounter.

 

 

Who is in charge?

N. Courier
Christ and the woman of Samaria at Jacob’s Well
lithograph, hand colored, between 1835 and 1836

“Is the LORD in our midst or not?” Exodus 17:7

To believe in God is to know God is present with us always.

God is in charge. God has not abandoned us or forsaken us. God will not let us be lost in the frightening, crazy, unjust, hard-hearted happenings of the world.

Today I will welcome the Lord. I will take time to listen for God’s voice. I will embody the Lord’s kindness by speaking respectfully to everyone I encounter.

The bad and the good

Károly Ferenczy (1862–1917)
Sermon on the Mountain
oil on canvas, 1896
Hungarian National Gallery

Jesus said to his disciples, “Your heavenly Father… makes his sun rise on the bad and the good, and causes rain to fall on the just and the unjust.” Matthew 5:45

Whenever I catch myself judging others, I remind myself that God loves all people equally. No one’s life is more or less valuable to the One who created us all in love and for love.

Lord, help me to see as you see and love as you love.

My choice

Persian Jesus (Isa) miniature of
Sermon on the Mount

If you choose you can keep the commandments,
they will save you;
if you trust in God, you too shall live;
he has set before you fire and water
to whichever you choose, stretch forth your hand.
Before man are life and death, good and evil,
whichever he chooses shall be given him.
Sirach 15:15-17

Today I will choose the qualities of God: patience, kindness, civility, respect, compassion, delight, and love.

I will choose self-responsibility and forgiveness.

I will choose to act with integrity and mercy.

I will choose quiet time with God.

 

 

Add flavor

George Pencz (ca.1500-1550)
To Feed the Hungry
Engraving
National Gallery of Art

Jesus said to his disciples: “You are the salt of the earth. But if salt loses its taste, with what can it be seasoned? It is no longer good for anything but to be thrown out and trampled underfoot.” Matthew 5:13

No matter our situation, we can add flavor to life by sharing kindness with those who are hungry for attention. We can offer the shelter of our compassion to those who are suffering. We can wrap the lonely in the caring warmth of our companionship.

Today I will seek quiet moments to pray and meditate so that I may not lose my taste for loving and serving my neighbor.

Gifts of age

Rembrandt (1606-1669)
Hannah and Simeon in the Temple
oil on panel, 1627-1628
Hamburg, Hamburger Kunsthalle

There was also a prophetess, Anna, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was advanced in years, having lived seven years with her husband after her marriage, and then as a widow until she was eighty-four. Luke 2:36-37

Good things happen even when we are old. We still welcome delightful surprises and the kind attention of others. We have the time to reflect on all we have experienced and to trace out the patterns in our lives. We know how to comfort the young, thanks to our history of overcoming challenges, disappointments, and hurts. We have the wisdom to recognize the good and the godly in others — and in ourselves.